Grounds for Change - Fair Trade Organic Coffee
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COMMUNITIES
Communities
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Fair Trade Coffee Communities

Listed below are brief descriptions of a few of the communities that you are helping to support through your purchase of Grounds for Change coffee.

Guatemala
This region is a beautiful combination of jungle and rainforest, with coffee growing throughout the forest floor. Among the coffee, a variety of other plants provide food for the producers and their families. It is very common to see bananas, beans, peppers, oranges, lemons and avocados growing within this diversified forest. This group of 366 coffee producers are spread out over the rugged mountain terrain, some as far away as a 3-4 hour walk. These growers exclusively offer their coffee as fair trade and when asked what they see as one of the greatest benefits of fair trade, they replied, "The men do not have to leave the village to work in the coastal area after the coffee harvest; they can remain home with their families."

Sumatra
From the scenic highland slopes of the Gayo Mountains in Northern Sumatra, comes the "Telong" Sumatra coffee. There are over 200 small coffee producers who contribute to this very important OCIA certified organic coffee production. The farmers and communities of this remote region face a number of environmental and socio-economic challenges, including soil erosion, deforestation, low and unstable incomes. The organization, production, technical assistance and higher prices for certified organic coffee help these remote farmers by being able to generate a better income for themselves and improve the economic basis in the communities.

Bolivia
The road from the Bolivian capital, La Paz, to the coffee growing valleys of the Yungas has officially been declared the most dangerous road in the world. The relatively narrow gravel track with waterfalls spilling onto it from above, and huge drops on the downhill slope, descends nearly 10,000 feet to the misty valleys of the Yungas.

During the 1950's, wealthy landowners took over this region and enslaved the native people. In 1991, through governmental land reform, the larger landowners were made to relinquish their holdings of these small farms and return the rightful ownership back to the native people. The small farmers are now entirely independent, have title to their own land and have freedom to search for ways to improve their income, their own lives, and the health of their community.

B Corporation

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